MEET THE DEVELOPER

A Real Game Changer

Too few women in games? The Sims Mobile’s Pam Iluore is on the case.

The Sims™ Mobile

Play with life.

VIEW

The Sims Mobile lets you create and manage the lives of curious virtual people. Pam Iluore makes sure the game accurately represents all of its players—which it hasn’t always done.

“Being one of the few black people and one of the few Filipinos working on the game, this was really important to me," Iluore says. “I had regular meetings with the lead character artist to talk about trends and how to ensure our representation was authentic. You see the result of that work in the clothing lines and ethnic hair categories now.”

Iluore hanging with a few of her favorite pals (they’re statues).

Iluore’s passion for inclusivity extends beyond the office. She mentors young women through LinkedIn and partners with the Berkeley Women in Games Club. In 2018, at the Grace Hopper Celebration—the world’s largest gathering of women in tech—Iluore spoke about how videogames can help reduce the STEM gender gap.

Being one of the few black people and one of the few Filipinos working on the game, this was really important to me.

“When I started out, I often wanted to talk to someone who was like me, but this was 2006,” Iluore says. “There weren’t a lot of women in videogame development back then. Now we have conversations about gender, we have conversations about color, accessibility—it’s all on the table. Progress is happening.”

Iluore has made it a mission to open doors for the next generation of game makers.

Iluore broke into the industry at age 17, working as a receptionist at a videogame studio in Santa Monica, California. “I didn’t care what I was doing, as long as it was in games,” she says. Nevertheless, she was surprised to find so few women working alongside her.

One woman who did buck the trend was Connie Booth, the VP of product development at Sony, who took Iluore under her wing during her stint working on the launch of the PlayStation 4. “I grew up playing Crash Bandicoot and when I saw Connie, I geeked out so hard,” Iluore remembers. “Realizing that our experiences were the same had a profound impact on me. I was like, ‘Yes, OK, I can do this. And I can help other women to do it too.’”

We have conversations about gender, we have conversations about color, accessibility—it’s all on the table.

Accurate ethnic hairstyles are now included in The Sims Mobile.

The confidence boost prompted her to move to interactive toy company GoldieBlox, where she worked on GoldieBlox and the Movie Machine, an app that challenged gender stereotypes with a young female inventor as its star.

She also became involved in the company’s grassroots efforts, working with organizations like the Girl Scouts and spearheading talks around girls in tech and STEM.

When Electronic Arts approached her with an offer to work in its mobile division in 2017, she saw it as an opportunity to speak directly to female gamers.

Iluore works with EA’s diversity department to find new ways of reaching and recruiting more minorities at the company.

“Everyone knows that more women are on mobile than on consoles,” she says. “I wanted to be where my people are at.”

At EA, Iluore found a tight-knit community of strong women and a culture that embraced diversity—so much so that she was able to turn her attention to improving The Sims’ community.

“Stopping toxicity in games is so important,” she says. “Some women are so turned off by toxic behavior they just won’t touch games again.”

The Sims Mobile is all about community. And parties. And dancing.

She’s here to bring them back—and now she has the platform to do it. “Big companies naturally move slower, but I think we can do more,” she says. “When the industry making the games is diverse and we get a diversity of opinions and ideas, we all benefit.”

    The Sims™ Mobile

    Play with life.

    VIEW