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Description

Bible King James Version with Apocrypha
The King James Version (KJV), commonly known as the Authorized Version (AV) or King James Bible (KJB), is an English translation of the Christian Bible for the Church of England begun in 1604 and completed in 1611. First printed by the King's Printer Robert Barker, this was the third translation into English to be approved by the English Church authorities.
James gave the translators instructions intended to guarantee that the new version would conform to the ecclesiology and reflect the episcopal structure of the Church of England and its belief in an ordained clergy. The translation was done by 47 scholars, all of whom were members of the Church of England. In common with most other translations of the period, the New Testament was translated from Greek, the Old Testament was translated from Hebrew text, while the Apocrypha were translated from the Greek and Latin.
The Biblical apocrypha (from the Greek word aπόκρυφος, apókruphos, meaning "hidden") denotes the collection of ancient books found, in some editions of the Bible, in a separate section between the Old and New Testaments or as an appendix after the New Testament. Although the term apocrypha had been in use since the 5th century, it was in Luther's Bible of 1534 that the Apocrypha was first published as a separate intertestamental section. Luther was making a polemical point about the canonicity of these books. As an authority for this division, he cited St. Jerome, who in the early 5th century distinguished the Hebrew and Greek Old Testaments, stating that books not found in the Hebrew were not received as canonical. Although his statement was controversial in his day, Jerome was later titled a Doctor of the Church and his authority was also cited in the Anglican statement in 1571 of the Thirty-Nine Articles.
King James Version
The English-language King James Version (KJV) of 1611 followed the lead of the Luther Bible in using an inter-testamental section labelled "Books called Apocrypha", or just "Apocrypha" at the running page header. The KJV followed the Geneva Bible of 1560 almost exactly (variations are marked below). The section contains the following:
1 Esdras (Vulgate 3 Esdras)
2 Esdras (Vulgate 4 Esdras)
Tobit
Judith ("Judeth" in Geneva)
Rest of Esther (Vulgate Esther 10:4-16:24)
Wisdom
Ecclesiasticus (also known as Sirach)
Baruch and the Epistle of Jeremy ("Jeremiah" in Geneva) (all part of Vulgate Baruch)
Song of the Three Children (Vulgate Daniel 3:24-90)
Story of Susanna (Vulgate Daniel 13)
The Idol Bel and the Dragon (Vulgate Daniel 14)
Prayer of Manasses (follows 2 Chronicles in Geneva)
1 Maccabees
2 Maccabees
Included in this list are those books of the Clementine Vulgate that were not in Luther's canon. These are the books most frequently referred to by the casual appellation "the Apocrypha". These same books are also listed in Article VI of the Thirty-Nine Articles of the Church of England. Despite being placed in the Apocrypha, in the table of lessons at the front of some printings of the King James Bible, these books are included under the Old Testament.

What’s New

Version 5.0

Fixes:
Adapted for iPhone X
Search engine improved
Corrected some verses
Fixed wrong page turning while verse selection
A lot of bug fixes
Stability improvements

New features:
Multiple verses selection
Verses of the day
Daily reading plans
Audio
App interface rotation
New more user friendly design
Flipping pages option
Added new setting options
Possibility to add bookmark for any verse
Possibility to notes bookmark for any verse
Possibility to highlight any verse
Search not only for text, but also for bookmarks, notes, highlights
Sharing verses
Bookmarks, notes and highlights are synchronised between different devices in your apple account via iCloud

Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
2.7K Ratings

2.7K Ratings

Say Mó ,

Great app makes you want to read

I’ve had the same bible app for a few yrs. I’m glad I found this one . It’s like reading a bible and not some tiny words on a screen. My eyes are fine and they’re young eyes but it’s annoying and boring when it feels like I’m reading SOPs for work or something.
This app makes me want to read. I usually read at night when I’m already relaxed and sleepy so seeing the big words help me to stay focused and awoke. I don’t want reading my bible to feel like a chore when I’m forcing myself to read those small letters. I even downloaded the other app that goes with this one. I love it!

Trena04 ,

Very Nice App!!

I love how easy it is to navigate. It’s very user-friendly. The interface and the layout is very clean. I love its cool features including the highlighting, note-taking, font style, option for audio, plus many more! And also most importantly, it contains the apocrypha in addition to the regularly included books in the King James Versions. However, I am just a wee-bit disappointed with the content. I went straightway looking for the book of Jasher only to find that it was not included. 😱 I hope that it can be added in an update in the near future! Overall though, love the app! Great job!

SexyVirgoGoddess ,

TonyJ Aka ejayremix

I really enjoy using this app. Being able to highlight text and use this application as a study tool is excellent ,but there's only one thing I wish they could improve. I wish they would make a PDF of instructions. Explaining all the features that you can do. For instance, being able to paste your favorite scripture to study for the day. And by adding an alarm clock to remind you when and what you wish to study for the day. But, over all I rate this app 5 stars.

Information

Seller
Oleg Shukalovich
Size
16.9 MB
Category
Books
Compatibility

Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

Languages

English, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish

Age Rating
4+
Copyright
Price
Free

Supports

  • Family Sharing

    With Family Sharing set up, up to six family members can use this app.

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